The Myth of Distance

Walk into church on a Sunday morning and it’s likely you’ll hear a message of self-improvement, good works, and moral development. All three are fine but they never bring anyone nearer to God, ever.

Unbelievers, atheists, and infidels – people who are our friends not the enemy – can improve themselves, engage in good works, and learn not to lie. That doesn’t make them Christians, far from it. Many Christians are shocked to hear that Christianity isn’t morality, it’s Jesus only.

No distance:

Doing something to close the distance between God and man is irrelevant and repugnant.

It’s irrelevant because there’s no distance between an unbeliever and Jesus. He couldn’t be nearer or more available. They may feel distant but He is not. They may reject Jesus but Jesus hasn’t rejected them. There is no “far” or “near” when it comes to becoming a believer. There is only faith.

It’s repugnant to think we can close the distance between God. It insults Jesus by devaluing His work on the cross. Satan must love it when religious knuckle-heads undermine the work of Jesus by working to reform sinners. Dry drunks, apart from Jesus, are just as lost as wet ones.

Apply:

Does the message of the gospel for sinners still apply to us after we’ve become believers? Or does it mystically change? After believing, do we maintain nearness by our goodness and lose it when we’re bad?

Truth is, when believers run from Jesus, He runs after them – think Peter. If they persist in running, He anxiously waits for them – think the Prodigal.

Arrogance:

It’s our arrogance and doubt that motivate us to believe nearness depends on good works, self-improvement, and morality.

Daily faith:

Step back and trust Him again today. Don’t think you’re becoming a Christian again. Think you’re being a Christian anew. Humbling isn’t it?

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